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Dynamic journalism at Bond

The journalism industry is constantly changing and evolving, and our Journalism degree at Bond adapts to these changes to ensure work readiness. At Bond, not only will you learn to craft and tell a story, you’ll also have the opportunity to specialise in the area you’re most passionate about. The Bachelor of Journalism allows students to find their creative side, incorporating traditional and non-traditional methods with emerging media trends. With a variety of University industry ties, students will be able to undertake assessment linked to real world publications.

Choose from a wide range of specialist Majors including: 
Social Media, Advertising, Sports Industry, International Relations and many more.

As a Journalism student at Bond, you have the opportunity and are encouraged to undertake internships in Australia or internationally, in places like New York, Washington and London. The Faculty of Society & Design has developed industry partnerships with leading organisations, allowing students the potential to intern with: the Australian Good Food Guide, Channel 7 Australia, Channel 10 Australia, Gold Coast Bulletin, and Smart Erickson. Bond’s dedicated Career Development Centre can assist students in finding internships and work experience, allowing them to further develop their skill set. Students will also be able to find mentors that are interested in and influential to their career ambitions.

Key features

  • Tailored study opportunities with the choice from 15 specialist majors
  • Learn practical and relevant skills from experienced industry professionals
  • Enhanced learning experience through small class sizes and accelerated degree options

About the program

The Bachelor of Journalism is recognised internationally for its quality and innovation, incorporating foundations in journalistic traditions with emerging media trends. Students are trained in news writing, broadcast reporting, photography, media rounds and industries, digital publication and design, media ethics and law. Show more

The Bachelor of Journalism is recognised internationally for its quality and innovation, incorporating foundations in journalistic traditions with emerging media trends. Students are trained in news writing, broadcast reporting, photography, media rounds and industries, digital publication and design, media ethics and law. Students can undertake specialised subjects such as Foreign Correspondence; Fashion, Travel and Sport Writing; Multimedia Production; Photojournalism; Creative Non-Fiction and Fiction Writing; Social Media and Citizen Journalism. Bond is committed to maintaining strong industry ties, with many assessment tasks linked to real world publication outcomes including internet publications. Students will have the opportunity to report for local, national and international media outlets throughout their degree and can undertake internships in Australia or internationally in places like New York, Washington and London. Show less

ModeOn Campus
Duration6 semesters (2 years)
Starting semesters
  • January 2018
  • May 2018
  • September 2018
  • September 2017
Program typeBachelors Degree
Study areaCommunication and Creative Media
Program codeHS-20026
CRICOS code063077B
Credit for prior studyFor more details on applying for credit, please contact the Student Business Centre: sbc@bond.edu.au

The Bachelor of Journalism allows students to find their creative side, while incorpoating journalists traditions with emerging media trends. With a varierty of Univeristy industry ties, students will be able to undertake assessment linked to real world publications.

This degree equips graduates with the ability to produce and edit content for a range of traditional and multimedia platforms, including newspapers, radio, television, web, tablet and social media. Students pursuing other vocations where journalistic skills are required will also find this program beneficial. Graduates could expect to find employment as broadcast journalists or hosts, television or radio producers, print journalists or editors, magazine feature writers or editors, web journalists or editors, photographers and photojournalists, professional writers or bloggers.

View the Bachelor of Journalism - Program Structure and Sequencing

The Bachelor of Journalism program comprises of these subjects, as follows:

Foundation subjects (13)

 

Specialist Major (6)

Choose 6 subjects from one of the following Majors avaliable:

Electives (2)

Students must choose two (2) elective subjects of which at least one (1) must come from the Faculty of Society & Design list of undergraduate subjects.

International students

To fulfil your student visa requirements, you will need to enrol in 40 credit points per semester.

Domestic students

Most students undertake four (4) subjects per semester (equivalent to 40 credit points). You may however enrol in fewer subjects and extend your degree over a longer period.

Teaching methodology

Bond University’s teaching methodology involves a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, examinations, projects, presentations, assignments, computer labs and industry projects.

The total program fees for the Bachelor of Journalism are:

  • $100,920
  • $101,928

When considering the fees associated with your studies, keep in mind that Bond’s accelerated schedule means you can finish your degree sooner and be out in the workforce up to a year earlier than if you went to another university.

This time saving also represents a substantial reduction in accommodation and living costs, plus a full year of extra earnings.

Find out your financing options and other costs to consider.

Academic requirements

Applicants with recent secondary education (within the past two years)

Applicants must meet the University's general minimum admission criteria.

The following table provides comparative information for those students admitted into this program wholly or partly on the basis of OP/ATAR in January semester 2017.

ATAR based offers only, across all offer roundsATAR (OP in QLD)
(Excluding adjustment factors)
Selection Rank
(ATAR/OP plus any adjustment factors)
Highest rank to receive an offerOP2/ATAR 9797
75th percentile rank to receive an offer #N/PN/P
Median percentile rank to receive an offer #N/PN/P
25th percentile rank to receive an offer #N/PN/P
Lowest rank to receive an offerOP15/ATAR 63.5567

Note: #N/P - indicates figure is not published if less than 25 ATAR-based offers made.

Visit our student profile if you are interested in the profile of all students who commenced undergraduate study at Bond University in the January semester 2017.

International Secondary School students

For more information for International Students, including the International Baccalaureate, please go to the International Secondary School equivalency page.

Alternative entry pathways

For those applicants who do not currently have the required academic qualifications, there are a number of alternative entry pathways:

  • Bond University Tertiary Preparation programs
  • Bond University Diploma programs
  • Other institutional Tertiary Preparation Programs
  • Vocational education and training qualifications (Certificate IV and above)
  • Prior higher education experience (at this university or another)
  • Special Tertiary Admissions Test (STAT)
  • Professional or para-professional qualifications/experience
  • Employment experience verified by a statement of service from the employer stating the position title and length of service and a very brief statement on the tasks undertaken.

For more information on what is required please visit our how to apply page.

English language proficiency requirements

As tuition is delivered in English, all students will be required to provide documented evidence of the required level of proficiency in the English language. Read more detailed information on English language proficiency requirements for university study.

Credit for prior study

Subject credits may be awarded for previous studies. To apply for credits, you will need to submit academic transcripts including detailed subject outlines/course descriptions for each relevant subject and/or certified copies of testamurs to the Office of Future Students. Please refer to how to apply for credit for more information

Key dates

Bond University calendar

How to apply

In order to apply for study at Bond University, you will need to complete the online application form. To find out more about the application process please refer to how to apply.

Student work

2017 JEMUN - Japan Highlights

As a journalist, our careers are comprised of curating and telling stories. We must be able to differentiate between a great story, a mediocre story, and one that is completely irrelevant. My experience at the Japanese English Model United Nations (JEMUN) will continue to be one of my greatest stories I will ever tell.  

JEMUN was my first ever MUN and I knew it was going to be fast-paced and hard work, especially as a video journalist. The experience however, was unlike anything I have done – one minute I was reporting on a blind, disabled Japanese musician who performed at the JEMUN opening ceremony and the next I was being dared by my Japanese partner Shota to eat the octopus out of our daily bento boxes (I did not). As a journalism student majoring in International Relations, JEMUN gave me the opportunity to utilise the skills I had learnt from both disciplines. Show more

As a journalist, our careers are comprised of curating and telling stories. We must be able to differentiate between a great story, a mediocre story, and one that is completely irrelevant. My experience at the Japanese English Model United Nations (JEMUN) will continue to be one of my greatest stories I will ever tell.  

JEMUN was my first ever MUN and I knew it was going to be fast-paced and hard work, especially as a video journalist. The experience however, was unlike anything I have done – one minute I was reporting on a blind, disabled Japanese musician who performed at the JEMUN opening ceremony and the next I was being dared by my Japanese partner Shota to eat the octopus out of our daily bento boxes (I did not). As a journalism student majoring in International Relations, JEMUN gave me the opportunity to utilise the skills I had learnt from both disciplines. Each day we had to report on our assigned topic of the day, film and then edit it, and upload it to JEMUN’s social media platforms, all while ensuring we were up-to-date on the issues unfolding between the nations. Shota and I were assigned to the Crisis Simulation room, which meant we had the more difficult job of reporting on the crises that suddenly unfolded and had to quickly interview the delegates to find out how their nation was planning to deal with the crisis. Although most of the crises were things such as tsunamis and earthquakes, on the last day the delegates encountered “Godzilla”, which shocked everyone. As we watched the delegates scramble to figure out how Godzilla had affected Japan and what measures could be taken to neutralise such a threat and protect citizens of Japan and neighbouring nations, we had to race to interview the delegates on their position on Godzilla. Even though the idea of Godzilla is highly improbable (hopefully) in real life, JEMUN succeeded in preparing both the delegates and journalists for the unexpected. More often than not, people working in both industries are exposed to unexpected events and because of this I believe it’s extremely important that students are taught this before they graduate and enter the workforce. As journalism is now progressively tailored towards technological advancements and people’s reliance upon phones and their access to various forms of social media reporting, this was one of the best preparations I could have received before leaving university and entering the industry.

As a journalist, we make connections with everyone we talk to. Japan provided me with an endless amount of connections – everyone was willing to add me on social media and promises were made to visit if we travelled to each other’s countries again. Having this experience behind me, I have become a far better journalist and have broadened my knowledge on the United Nations and subsequently international relations in general. Even though JEMUN only ran for three days, I made friends I will never forget and will forever be grateful for the better journalist I became because of JEMUN. I was exposed to both areas of my study in the most productive and effective way possible and I will always appreciate my time in Japan and what their culture and people taught me. I would highly recommend Model United Nations to anyone who is interested in or studying international relations as it not only truly opens your world up to many possibilities but enables you to learn so much more than what you can in a classroom and allows you to make unforgettable connections that will undoubtedly help you in the future. JEMUN was one of the most exciting and educational things I have ever done and I hope more journalism students follow in my footsteps to experience this amazing opportunity. Show less