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LAWS77-795: Japanese Law

Description

Japanese Law is an elective subject in postgraduate programs offered by the Faculty of Law. In this subject students will use Japan as a case study to develop the skills of cross-cultural reasoning — the ability to discern how legal culture, politics, economics, institutional design and other variables impact on the operation of a foreign legal system. By the end of the subject, students will be able to critically evaluate contemporary developments in Japan, as well as reflect on some of the broader challenges facing lawyers working in transnational and cross-cultural contexts. The subject covers a wide range of legal topics, including litigation trends, gender discrimination, criminal justice, social activism of Japanese judges, corporate governance, contracts and commercial regulation.

Subject details

TypePostgraduate
CodeLAWS77-795
FacultyFaculty of Law
Credit10

Learning outcomes

1. Problem-solving: to critically re-examine traditional textual problem-solving, especially its relationship to studying Asian legal systems. 2. Contextual/textural legal analysis: to explore the internal “contextual” and internal “cultural” factors that influence the development and operation of law in Japan. 3. Applied research skills: to research contemporary and cut-edge developments in Japanese law to gain nuanced insights into the contextual operation of law in Japan.

Enrolment requirements

Requisites: ?

Nil

Assumed knowledge:

Assumed knowledge is the minimum level of knowledge of a subject area that students are assumed to have acquired through previous study. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they meet the assumed knowledge expectations of the subject. Students who do not possess this prior knowledge are strongly recommended against enrolling and do so at their own risk. No concessions will be made for students’ lack of prior knowledge.

Juris Doctor students are expected to have completed a minimum of 80 credit points of compulsory law subjects.

Restrictions: ?

Students must be into a Masters law degree OR LA-43040 Doctor of Legal Science (Research) OR be an approved Law Study Abroad or Law Exchange student.

This subject is not available as a general elective. To be eligible for enrolment, the subject must be specified in the students’ program structure.

Anti-requisites: ?

Subject dates

Future offerings not yet planned.