Our Vision

Drawing upon the expertise of its members and the heritage of the Centre for Legal Education (with which the CPLE merged in 2017), the CPLE aspires to be recognised as a leading source of legal education research and scholarship within the Asia-Pacific Region. At present, our research priorities are:

  • the impact of emergent technologies on law and legal practice;
  • professional identity formation in law students; and
  • globalisation of legal education and practice.

Research focus

While research and scholarship concerning any aspect of legal education falls within the scope of the Centre’s activities, the Centre has a particular focus upon the following:

  • The internationalisation of legal education 
  • The preparation of law students for professional practice
  • The meaning of legal professionalism and how it can be taught
  • The teaching and assessment of practical legal skills
  • Clinical legal education
  • Work integrated learning in law
  • The teaching of legal ethics and the ethics of legal teaching
  • Law student and legal practitioner wellness
  • Public legal education and raising public awareness of legal issues
  • Judicial legal education.

Current projects

It is difficult to imagine the future of legal practice in the next 20 years. The profession is facing significant change in the face of blockchain, artificial intelligence, robots and automated vehicles… to name a few of the technologies already affecting society.

In the same way, we need to be thinking differently about legal education. How will we educate the lawyers of the future? What sort of work will lawyers do in 20 years’ time? Will society even need lawyers?

Technology is already transforming the way law is practised, but it is not making lawyers obsolete. There are critical thinking, creative thinking and interpersonal skills that only human lawyers can exercise.

However we can see change afoot, and recognise that there is a host of other skills that will be called upon to solve legal problems into the future. At Bond, we see a need for a new type of legal expert. One that doesn’t provide legal advice, but instead facilitates the design and delivery of technology-enhanced legal services and legal solutions.

At Bond University, we want to design a new type of legal qualification.

Read more about the legal qualification of the future. 

Contact us at [email protected] to let us know your thoughts.

Invitation to participate in national research project

'The Impact of Emergent Technologies Upon the Teaching of Core Law Units in the Australian Law Curriculum'

The structure of the accredited Australian law degree – both the Bachelor of Law (LLB) and the Juris Doctor (JD) – continues to be determined primarily by the need to demonstrate coverage of the ‘Priestley 11’ (P11) prescribed areas of knowledge: administrative law, civil dispute resolution, company law, constitutional law, contract law, criminal law and procedure, equity, evidence, professional conduct, property law and tort law. The P11 areas of knowledge are taught via a series of core law units within the law degree, the content of which is relatively consistent across Australian law schools. Meanwhile, the practice of law is undergoing rapid change, largely because of the emergence of disruptive digital technologies. There is a clear need for law schools to adjust the way law is taught to ensure law graduates continue to be effectively prepared for contemporary legal practice. Many of the recent reports regarding the future of legal education and of the legal profession call for an increased emphasis in the law curriculum upon teaching digital skills and knowledge of emergent technologies, equipping work-ready graduates for technology-enhanced or technology-centric practice, while at the same time emphasising the need to retain the existing emphasis upon more traditional legal knowledge and skills.

The challenge confronting Australian law schools is the fact that many of the legal academics responsible for teaching the core law units lack the time, resources and expertise to identify and evaluate the impact of emergent technologies upon the law curriculum. The objective of this Project is to assist Australian law schools to address this challenge.

The Project will investigate the impact of emergent technologies upon the teaching of the core law units in the Australian law curriculum. The Project Leadership Team has settled the overall research questions and method, and identified six categories of emergent technologies. Legal scholars from a variety of Australian law schools are now being invited to conduct multiple ‘Micro-Projects’ to identify the impact of each category of emergent technology upon each P11 area of knowledge. The Project’s scholarly outputs will include periodic reports, journal articles, and a monograph. The practical outputs of the first phase of the Project will be reports identifying (1) the impact of particular emergent technologies upon a particular P11 area of knowledge and any consequent changes to the way the P11 area of knowledge should be taught, and (2) the educational resources for law students and law teachers needed to ensure the core law unit appropriately acknowledges and incorporates the impact of the emergent technologies. The second phase of the Project will be the development of these resources.

Read more about your role and project details.

Expressions of interest are invited for the following micro-projects:

 

CET A

CET B

CET C

CET D

CET E

CET F

Administrative  Law

A1

B1

C1

D1

E1

F1

Civil dispute resolution

A2

B2

C2

D2

E2

F2

Company law

A3

B3

C3

D3

E3

F3

Constitutional law

A4

B4

C4

D4

E4

F4

Contract law

A5

B5

C5

D5

E5

F5

Criminal law and procedure

A6

B6

C6

D6

E6

F6

Equity

A7

B7

C7

D7

E7

F7

Evidence

A8

B8

C8

D8

E8

F8

Professional conduct

A9

B9

C9

D9

E9

F9

Property  law

A10

B10

C10

D10

E10

F10

Tort law

A11

B11

C11

D11

E11

F11

*Projects in blue have received an EOI. 

Contact [email protected] for more information. 

Voiceless believes in the power of education and the importance of critical thinking to ensure today's youth are tomorrow's change-makers. Voiceless has been leading the way in Australia with a new, exciting field: Animal Protection Education (APE) and Animal Law Education (ALE).

Voiceless is continuing to build and support the animal law movement across Australia through their Animal Law Education program. In collaboration with the Centre for Professional Legal Education, and in consultation with animal law academics around the country, Voiceless is creating online resources to assist in the teaching of animal law at Australian universities.

These resources will be freely available to both existing and new animal lecturers, consisting of various topic modules, such as 'Animal Ethics', 'Wild Animals in the Law' and 'Agricultural Animals in the Law'. Within each module, Voiceless is preparing high-quality presentations, podcasts and tutorial activities, in collaboration with global animal experts.

Voiceless is continuing to support the animal law education community by hosting the Animal Law Education Workshop in November 2018, which brings together animal law academics from across Australia and New Zealand. They are also maintaining support of student-focused initiatives, such as the ANIMAL Moot and delivering guest lectures into animal law units across the country, as well as animal law conferences and events. Read more

The Centre supports and encourages members to engage in legal education scholarship and research projects, and produce high quality and impactful research outputs including monographs, journal articles, and conference papers. The CPLE also hosts and publishes legal education journals, including but not limited to the Legal Education Review and the Australian Journal of Clinical Education.

The Centre and its members are available to engage in legal education research projects commissioned by public and private organisations. Contact [email protected] for more information.

The Centre facilitates and coordinates the recruitment, enrolment and supervision of HDR students (including PhD, SJD and LLM by Research students) engaging in legal education research and scholarship. Contact [email protected] for more information about enrolling as a HDR student in the CPLE at Bond Law.