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History made at Bond Bolt

March 16, 2022

By Lilli Wyatt

Actuarial Science student Daniel Paddison made history by winning the inaugural 2.5km Bond Bolt on Wednesday.

The 21-year-old blitzed the 71-competitor field by 40 seconds, winning the cross-campus run in a swift 7:27.  

Recovering from a hip impingement and torn labrum, Paddison says getting back his fitness was no easy journey.

“I had surgery two years ago so I am still coming back to where I was before that,” Paddison said.

 “I’ve only been doing 30km a week at the moment, so it was a good hit out.

“I’m backing up from the Mooloolaba triathlon on Sunday, so I guess I just pushed as hard as I could today.

“I had a good run for my money at the start, everyone went out pretty quick.”

Paddison set a blistering start and was never headed as the field headed north from The Spine, looped around Bond University Ring Road, past the sporting fields, over the bridge and around the Ornamental Lawns.

He had a handy gap on the field as he approached ‘Heartbreak Hill’ before turning towards Blackboard Café and extending his lead to the finish.

“It was pretty quick at the start and then I maintained speed pretty much all the way around,” he said.

“That first hill broke it a bit.

“The last one wasn’t too bad because you got that downhill into it.

“I decided to push it a little bit this time. I think I have finally got it down pat.”

Exercise and Sports Science student Lily Ball was the first female across the line, finishing in a speedy 8:59.

The 18-year-old was second at the halfway point of the course but finished strong to take out the women’s title by eight seconds. 

“I don’t really mind hills,” Ball said.

“I enjoy running but I am not a runner, I just do it for fun when I feel like it.

“I thought it would be fun to give it a shot. It was a great experience and I would definitely do it again.”

Event organisers were pleased with the turnout.

“It was a good chance to get around everyone at the Uni and obviously see how everyone else is going,” Paddison said.

“Even if it’s not the most professional athletes, it’s like, ‘Everyone come down to have a hit out with all your mates’.”