Coronavirus (COVID-19): advice and support for the Bond community. Read more

Inappropriate behaviour

Bullying, discrimination & harassment

Bond University encourages staff and students to work together to maintain a respectful environment where all staff, students and visitors can feel safe and free from unacceptable behaviour.

What is bullying?

Bullying is when people repeatedly and intentionally use words or action against someone or a group of people to cause distress and risk to their well being. These actions are usually done by people who have more influence or power over someone else, or who want to make someone feel less powerful or helpless.

The sort of repeated behaviour that can be considered bullying includes:

  • keeping someone out of a group (online or offline)
  • acting in an unpleasant way near or towards someone
  • giving nasty looks, making rude gestures, calling names, being rude and impolite and constantly negative teasing
  • spreading rumours or lies, or misrepresenting someone (ie. using their Facebook account to post messages as if it were them)
  • intentionally stalking someone

Visit the Australian Human Rights Commission to find out more.

What to do if you feel you have been bullied?

Sometimes people who have been bullied can feel unsure about talking to others, but taking action may stop the bullying. The University wants our students to be safe and encourages you to report bullying. Everyone has the right to study in an environment free from bullying, harassment, discrimination and violence. The University takes a strong stance against this behaviour in the learning environment.

What is harassment?

Harassment is unwelcome conduct that might reasonable cause a person to be offended, humiliated or intimidated because they have a particular attribute. Harassment can also occur if someone is working in a 'hostile' or intimidating environment. The behaviours can be overt or subtle, verbal, non-verbal or physical and include the use of technology.

What to do if you feel you have been harassed?

Sometimes people who have been harassed can feel unsure about talking to others, but taking action may stop the harassment. The University wants our students to be safe and encourages you to report harassment.

What is discrimination?

Discrimination is treating or proposing to treat an individual unfavourably because of their particular personal characteristics (eg. ethnicity, place or origin, language and culture) or because they belong to a certain group (e.g. socio-economic status)

Discrimination can be direct or indirect:

  • Direct discrimination can occur when a person or group is treated less favourable than another person or group in a similar situation, because of a particular characteristic.
  • Indirect discrimination involves imposing a requirement, condition or practice that operates to disadvantage a person or group with a particular characteristic and that is not reasonable.

Unlawful discrimination includes unfair treatment of a person in areas of public life on the basis of the following characteristics: age, association with a child, caring responsibilities, gender identity, disability, marital or domestic partnership status, pregnancy, race, religion, religious appearance or dress (in work or study), sex, sexual orientation, or spouse or domestic partner's identity.

What to do if you feel you have experienced discriminated?

Sometimes people who have experienced discrimination can feel unsure about talking to others, but taking action may stop the discrimination. The University wants our students to be safe and encourages you to report discrimination.

Specialised help

Bond University has specialised trained staff and students to deal with the following specific issues:

Confidentiality

Information provided is confidential and is only used for the purpose for which it was provided and by people within the process.

Exceptions to this include:

  • if the information gives the University reasonable grounds for concern about security of people or property
  • if the individual who provided the evidence gives express consent
  • when procedural fairness requires the information to be shared
  • when access to information is required by law.